Diagnosis of Uveitis

Diagnosis of Uveitis

Given that uveitis can potentially cause vision loss, it is important it is diagnosed as soon as the symptoms are first experienced. Patients suspected of having uveitis are typically referred to an ophthalmologist (a specialist eye doctor) for further examination and diagnosis. 

Diagnostic approaches may vary between countries, but the following diagnostic tests are typically used:

  • Full medical history and blood tests (it is also important to determine whether the uveitis is caused by an underlying disease or an infection as this will determine what treatment should be used, and whether the patient also needs to be referred to another specialist for assessment and treatment)
  • Comprehensive eye examination, that may consist of the following tests:
    • Basic visual acuity test: To evaluate whether vision has been affected
    • Ophthalmoscopy: A test that can be used to inspect the retina, optic disc, and vitreous humor
    • Eye pressure test
    • Slit lamp examination: an examination of the anterior segment and posterior segment of the eye that can be used to evaluate the location of the inflammation and make a diagnosis of anterior, intermediate or posterior uveitis

Complications of uveitis

If left untreated, the inflammation caused by uveitis may lead to a number of eye complications, which the diabetic eye is already vulnerable to including:

  • Vision loss
  • Glaucoma (further details in the Diabetic Glaucoma Section)
  • Cataracts (further details in the Diabetic Cataract Section)
  • Cystoid macular oedema (further details in the Diabetic Macular Edema Section)
  • Optic nerve damage (further details in the Diabetic Glaucoma Section)
  • Retinal Detachment (further details in the Diabetic Retinopathy Section)